Call for Papers on Migration and Poverty

September 1, 2016

We're happy to announce a call for papers regarding migration brokerage, debt and precarious employment. Abstracts for the upcoming international conference "Migrating out of Poverty: From Evidence to Policy" conference are due September 15th. 

From the website:

New patterns of mobility are continuously shaping and being shaped by macro processes of globalisation on the one hand and local processes embedded in culture, class, ethnicity and race on the other hand. New transnational alliances, actors and institutions are shaping the “power geometry” of migration by determining who migrates, why, where, and under what circumstances. Gendered and ethnic identities have pushed men and women into certain types of migrant labour and created specific niches and segmented labour markets where some forms of work are feminized and ascribed a lower market value. 

This international conference invites decision makers, funders, scholars, and practitioners to explore these new configurations of mobility, particularly those of poorer social groups. Our aim is to inform migration policy based on contextualised and intersectional understandings of migration. The conference is structured around two key notes; four plenaries providing critical insights into cutting-edge research and the translation of research into evidence for policy; and four parallel sessions with three streams of panels. It is hosted by the Migrating out of Poverty Research Programme Consortium, which is funded by the UK’s Department for International Development (DFID).

Taking as our point of departure on-going research within the consortium, we invite papers and multimedia contributions addressing the themes described below. We would like all submissions to take gender differences into consideration and focus on both men and women. We hope the conference will highlight how emerging evidence on migration and poverty can promote more effective policy interventions to ensure the benefits of migration and reduce its costs and risks for poor people.